Help get this topic noticed by sharing it on Twitter, Facebook, or email.

How can HughesNet Voice subscribers call tech support if satellite is down?

I've been a loyal Hughes customer for 5+ years, and just today I received a piece of promo mail from Hughes advertising HughesNet Voice. After researching this new phone service I understand that this VoIP feature will only work when the satellite & modem are working properly. Like many Hughes customers I live in an area that has no cell phone signal, therefore a standard old school land line has remained the only option for phone service. In the past when my HughesNet service went down, I had to stay on the phone for hours, generally making numerous calls, in order to get a service tech scheduled to come repair my system; which causes my current concern with this new Voice service:

If I pay for HughesNet Voice, then in the future my system goes out/down how will HughesNet know to send out a service tech if I cannot call HughesNet Tech Support? If I've missed something I apologize for wasting the Hughes Team's time, but I did allot of research on this topic, and could not find any solution for this problem. I have a home based business to keep running, so it's important for me to contact tech support immediately if my system fails; so I want to be certain I won't run into this problem before I agree to this new service.

Will Tech Support automatically know my system is down, and send someone out, or will I still be responsible for contacting hughes to let them know my system is down?

Also, anytime an service tech has been scheduled to come out, they have always called the very morning of the scheduled repair, but if you happen to not answer the phone, then they don't come out, which means your system does not get fixed on that day. If you do not answer the phone the following morning then they never come out until they speak to you first to make sure someone will be on site when they arrive. So with HughesNet Voice installed, would the service tech be notified that my phone is not working since my service is down, therefore he would just have to drive out anyway, or would he never show up to do the repair?

Again, sorry if these questions have already been answered someplace, or if I'm missing the obvious, but these seem like legitimate concerns for myself, or anyone else thinking of subscribing to HughesNet's Voice service.
Hopefully someone can shed some light on these questions.
Thanks in advance.
4 people have
this question
+1
Reply
  • Those are very good questions, and those questions are the reason I stick with landline phone service, or cell service. IMO, VOIP is something that should be supplemental instead of primary.
  • (some HTML allowed)
    How does this make you feel?
    Add Image
    I'm

    e.g. sad, anxious, confused, frustrated indifferent, undecided, unconcerned happy, confident, thankful, excited kidding, amused, unsure, silly

  • 4
    Louis Boyle,
    Excellent question. My understanding, however, from reading HughesNet's promotional material at http://internet.hughesnet.com/ is that you should never have to worry about the HughesNet satellites going down because HughesNet provides an "always-on connection." According to my dictionary, the adverb always is defined as at all times; on all occasions.
    .
    .

    .
    .
    Kidding aside, I also received the VoIP promotional card in the mail on Wednesday. The introductory price is $20 for the first three months. For me, that gets me over two-thirds of the way to the cost of a land line in my area, which includes the call waiting and messaging services. Hence, HughesNet's VoIP seems rather expensive to me, but the economics of land line service in your area may e very different than mine. If you're running a business from home that requires telephonic availability, then your question is very important; I hope you get a quick reply.
    • LOL! Very funny Steven!
      I could actually save a few bucks with the Voice service "IF" the service were "always-on", and the equipment never broke. If something broke though, or if my service went down, I'd be SOL, and I'd hate to think of how much money my business would lose while trying to get a tech out to fix the system. Besides, every time my system has gone down in the past, I quickly paid for dial up service in order to operate the "basics" of my business until the hughes tech could get me up and going again. With Voice I wouldn't even be able to do this.

      Glad I took time to ask, and thank you all for your responses. Perhaps this service is good for some situations, I wouldn't know, but I can't find any benefit in using it at all.
  • (some HTML allowed)
    How does this make you feel?
    Add Image
    I'm

    e.g. sad, anxious, confused, frustrated indifferent, undecided, unconcerned happy, confident, thankful, excited kidding, amused, unsure, silly

  • Hi Louis, thanks for the great question. HughesNet Voice offers a web-based Self Care Portal that you will be able to access here http://voip.selfcare.hughes.com/. Once you register you will be able to manage many of your HughesNet Voice features. Also, if for some reason you are having any difficulty in getting your HughesNet Voice to work you can always connect with us here http://customercare.myhughesnet.com/s... over Chat or send us an Email http://customercare.myhughesnet.com/s... and we will be able to help.

    Regarding your worst case scenario of no internet service, no HughesNet Voice and repair technician needed. Then you'd want to use a neighbor's phone or find some way to contact us and alert us that this is happening and we will make sure that everything is addressed and taken care of for you.

    Suz
    • Suz, I am curious, current troubleshooting requires someone to be able to call while having access to the modem to help with early stages of testing. How would a subscriber be able to take a phone upwards of a mile from the nearest neighbor to their home for these steps? Does Hughes have a different way of troubleshooting in this scenario? Would they be able to relay to dealers/technicians in the field that phone service doesn't exist at the residence and that they need to go out at a very specific time/date?

      These questions are only because Satellite is meant for customers in the middle of no-where, and many people can live miles from the next nearest person which would make traditional calling to troubleshoot impossible.

      WORST case scenario: Storms knock dish out of alignment, VOIP is offline due to this, internet is also out. Cellphone coverage does not exist in the slightest at the site, and the nearest landline phone available is 1+ miles away, no neighbors exist.

      How would a customer get assistance and get it with-out hassle from tier one technicians that would not understand the above circumstances?
  • (some HTML allowed)
    How does this make you feel?
    Add Image
    I'm

    e.g. sad, anxious, confused, frustrated indifferent, undecided, unconcerned happy, confident, thankful, excited kidding, amused, unsure, silly

  • Hello Louis and Charles, if there is no opportunity to use a cell phone or a neighbor's phone we couldn't perform troubleshooting. In this case a technician visit would be in order. Thank you, Sara
  • (some HTML allowed)
    How does this make you feel?
    Add Image
    I'm

    e.g. sad, anxious, confused, frustrated indifferent, undecided, unconcerned happy, confident, thankful, excited kidding, amused, unsure, silly

  • 2
    Thanks for everyone's reply. HughesNet Voice is obviously not for me, as I don't have any neighbors close enough to use their phone to contact HughesNet several times, and troubleshooting my equipment via phone support would be impossible if my connection were down. Our current land line plans begin at around $40, excluding long distance, however I buy calling cards at an online auction site, which gets my long distance bill down to around $2.00 per month. Land line seems so outdated with most of my friends & family, however none of them live in the boondocks, which means they would not rely on Hughes for any service anyway.
    Now that I know the facts, I can't imagine a scenario where I would prefer Hughes Voice over a land line phone. Over the past 5 years my service has gone out numerous times, which required an onsite tech visit on every occasion. It can be a real hassle to get the tech visit scheduled, even with a land line phone, so I can not imagine the hassle involved if I were relying on this new Voice service.
    Thanks but no thanks!
  • (some HTML allowed)
    How does this make you feel?
    Add Image
    I'm

    e.g. sad, anxious, confused, frustrated indifferent, undecided, unconcerned happy, confident, thankful, excited kidding, amused, unsure, silly

  • 3
    Louis, It sounds like you already made up your mind but I just thought I should add that if your power goes out then so will VoIP. Leaving you isolated when you need the phone the most. I also deal with a number of people who use VoIP (not by Hughes) and voice quality has been lower, with occasional distortions, and short drop offs. This tends to give people a bad impression about a business.
    • I hadn't thought of the power going out. Also hadn't thought of poor call/sound quality affecting how my customers & business partners may perceive my business. Both very good points. Thanks for adding that! Hopefully others will take all these things into consideration before getting into a contract they can't get out of easily.
  • (some HTML allowed)
    How does this make you feel?
    Add Image
    I'm

    e.g. sad, anxious, confused, frustrated indifferent, undecided, unconcerned happy, confident, thankful, excited kidding, amused, unsure, silly